The Ghosts of Emily...

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Works Cited

Introduction: Which Dickinson?

 

Glaspell, Susan. The Complete Plays. Ed. Linda Ben-Zvi and J. Ellen Gainor. MacFarland and Co., 2010. 

 

Higginson, “Emily Dickinson’s Letters.” The Atlantic, October 1891. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1891/10/emily-dickinsons-letters/306524/. Accessed 16 March 2021.  

 

Kohler, Michelle. “Introduction: Dickinson Dispersed.” The New Emily Dickinson Studies, ed. Michelle Kohler. Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 1-14. 

 

Perlow, Seth. “Textures Newly Visible: Seeing and Feeling the Online Dickinson Archives.”  The New Emily Dickinson Studies, ed. Michelle Kohler. Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 239-257. 

 

---. “Who Gets Emily Dickinson?” Los Angeles Review of Books. 9 September 2019. https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/gets-emily-dickinson/. Accessed 17 March 2021. 

 

Schweitzer, Ivy. White Heat: Emily Dickinson in 1862, A Weekly Blog. Dartmouth University, 28 December 2018 – present. https://journeys.dartmouth.edu/whiteheat/. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Taggard, Genevieve. The Life and Mind of Emily Dickinson. Knopf, 1930. Internet Archive. https://archive.org/details/lifemindofemilyd00tagg/page/n9/mode/2up. Accessed 16 March 2021.

 

 

Specters on Screen 

 

A Quiet Passion. Directed by Terence Davies, performances by Cynthia Nixon, Jennifer Ehle, Keith Carradine, Soda Pictures, 2016. 

 

Ammonite. Directed by Francis Lee, performances by Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan, Lionsgate, 2020. 

 

Carol. Directed by Todd Haynes, performances by Rooney Mara and Cate Blanchett, Number 9 Films and Killer Films, 2015. 

 

Colette. Directed by Wash Westmoreland, performances by Keira Knightley, Dominic West, Eleanor Tominson, Lionsgate 2018. 

 

Elisa & Marcela. Directed by Isabel Coixet, performances by Natalia de Molina and Greta Fernández, Netflix, 2019.

 

The Favourite. Directed by Yorgos Lanthimos, performances by Oliva Colman, Rachel Weisz, and Emma Stone, Fox Searchlight Pictures, 2018. 

 

“Lesbian Period Drama.” Saturday Night Live, created by Lorne Michaels, performances by Carey Mulligan, Heidi Gardner, and Kate McKinnon, season 48 episode 17, SNL Studios, 10 April 2021.

 

Portrait of a Lady on Fire. Directed by Céline Sciamma, performances by Noémie Merlant and Adèle Haenel, Pyramide Films, 2019.

 

Smith, Alena, creator. Dickinson. Apple, 2019-present.

 

Vita & Virginia. Directed by Chanya Button, performances by Gemma Arterton, Elizabeth Debicki, and Isabella Rossellini, Thunderbird Releasing, 2018.

 

Wild Nights with Emily. Directed by Madeleine Olnek, performances by Molly Shannon, Susan Ziegler, Amy Seimetz, Jackie Monahan, Brett Gelman, Greenwich Entertainment, 2018. 

 


 

"Some keep the Sabbath going to Church -/ I keep it, staying at Home-": Dickinson in Film

 

A Quiet Passion. Directed by Terence Davies, performances by Cynthia Nixon, Jennifer Ehle, Keith Carradine, Soda Pictures, 2016. 

 

Wild Nights with Emily. Directed by Madeleine Olnek, performances by Molly Shannon, Susan Ziegler, Amy Seimetz, Jackie Monahan, Brett Gelman, Greenwich Entertainment, 2018. 


Asahina, Midori. “Reconsidering Mabel Loomis Todd’s Role in Promoting Emily Dickinson’s Writings.” Women’s Studies, vol. 47, no. 3, 2018, pp. 302-316.  

 

Brody, Richard. “Terence Davies’s Truthful Fictions About Emily Dickinson.” The New Yorker, 19 April 2017. https://www.newyorker.com/culture/richard-brody/terence-daviess-truthful-fictions-about-emily-dickinson. Accessed 16 March 2021.  

 

Handler, Rachel. “Behind the New, Gloriously Queer Emily Dickinson Movie.” Vulture, 18 April 2019. https://www.vulture.com/2019/04/behind-the-new-gloriously-queer-emily-dickinson-movie.html. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Pulver, Andrew. “Cynthia Nixon: Emily Dickinson would have loved Twitter.” The Guardian, 15 February 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/feb/15/cynthia-nixon-a-quiet-passion-emily-dickinson-twitter-berlinale. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Scott, A.O. “Review: ‘A Quiet Passion’ Poetically Captures Emily Dickinson.” The New York Times, 13 April 2017. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/13/movies/review-a-quiet-passion-poetically-captures-emily-dickinson.html. Accessed 16 March 2021.  

 

Schweitzer, Ivy. White Heat: Emily Dickinson in 1862, A Weekly Blog. Dartmouth University, 28 December 2018 – present. https://journeys.dartmouth.edu/whiteheat/. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Sims, David. “A Quiet Passion is a Biopic Told With Poetic Scope.” The Atlantic, 21 April 2017. https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/04/a-quiet-passion-review/523869/. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Wilkinson, Alissa. “A new movie remembers the real Emily Dickinson – passionate, ambitious, and queer.” Vox, 18 April 2019. https://www.vox.com/culture/2019/4/18/18311745/wild-nights-with-emily-interview-madeleine-olnek-molly-shannon-lesbian. Accessed 16 March 2021.

 

 

Dickinson’s (In)visible Emily

 

Fr The Poems of Emily Dickinson. Ed. R. W. Franklin. 3 vols. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1998. Citation by poem number.

 

“Because I could not stop.” Dickinson, written by Alena Smith, directed by David Gordon Green, Apple, 2019. 

 

“Before I got my eye put out.” Dickinson, written by Alena Smith, directed by Christopher Storer, Apple, 2021. 

 

Brown, Henry Box. Narrative of the Life of Henry Box Brown, Written by Himself: Electronic Edition. E450 .B769 1851. Documenting the American South. Academic Affairs Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, https://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/brownbox/brownbox.html, Accessed 8 April 2021. 

 

Handler, Rachel. “Emily Dickinson Didn’t Really Get High on Opium at a House Party, Right?” Vulture, 6 November 2019. 

 

“I’m Nobody! Who are you?” Dickinson, written by Alena Smith and Ayo Edebiri, directed by Stacie Passon, Apple, 2021. 

 

“I have never seen ‘Volcanoes.’” Dickinson, written by Alena Smith and Rachel Axler, directed by David Gordon Green, Apple, 2019. 

 

“I Like a Look of Agony.” Dickinson, written by Robbie Macdonald, directed by Silas Howard, Apple, 2021. 

 

McHenry, Jackson. “The Story Behind Dickinson, a Sexy, Queer, Gothic, Millenial Apple TV+ Sitcom.” Vulture, 28 October 2019.

 

The North Star [Rochester, N.Y.], 1847-1851. Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/sn84026365/. Accessed 8 April 2021. 

 

 

Queer Visual Poem

 

Chaiken, Ilene, creator. The L Word. Showtime, 2004. 

 

 

Big Reputations 

 

Fr The Poems of Emily Dickinson. Ed. R. W. Franklin. 3 vols. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1998. Citation by poem number.

 

Ahlgrim, Callie and Courteney Larocca. “Taylor Swift’s ‘Evermore’ isn’t as good as ‘Folklore,’ but it’s still better than what everyone else is doing.” Insider, 11 December 2020. https://www.insider.com/taylor-swift-evermore-review-tracklist-breakdown-2020-12

 

Braca, Nina. “Glittery Guitars to a New ‘Reputation’: The Many Eras Taylor Swift.” Billboard, 13 December 2017. https://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/pop/8070450/taylor-swift-eras-looks-albums-reputation

 

Brinck-Johnsen, Annelise. “Lyric Ecstasies of Queer Time.” Women’s Studies, vol. 47, no. 3, 2018, pp. 333-349. 

 

Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886. Herbarium, circa 1839-1846. 1 volume (66 pages) in green cloth case; 37 cm. MS Am 1118.11, Houghton Library © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

 

---. Open Me Carefully: Emily Dickinson’s Intimate Letters to Susan Huntington Dickinson, ed. by Martha Nell Smith and Ellen Louise Hart, Wesleyan University Press, 1998.

 

Ellis, Jonathan. “Old Romantics.” Tis the Damn Season: Taylor Swift’s evermore. Post45, 23 December 2020, https://post45.org/2020/12/old-romantics/

 

Finnerty, Páraic. “‘If fame belonged to me, I could not escape her’: Dickinson and the Poetics of Celebrity.” The Emily Dickinson Journal, vol. 26, no. 2, 2017, pp. 25-50. 

 

Greenup, Martin. “The Glimmering Frontier: Emily Dickinson and Publication.” The Cambridge Quarterly, vol. 33, no. 4, 2004, pp. 345-362. 

 

Grindell, Samantha. “Taylor Swift’s $2,875 plaid coat from her ‘Evermore’ cover sold out within hours—and it’s not the only pricey item fans are snapping up.” Insider.com, 11 December 2020. https://www.insider.com/taylor-swifts-coat-from-evermore-cover-sold-out-within-hours-2020-12.

 

Pareles, Jon. “‘Evermore’ Review: Taylor Swift’s ‘Folklore’ Sequel Is a Journey Deeper Inward.” The New York Times, 11 December 2020. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/11/arts/music/taylor-swift-evermore-review.html

 

Petrusich, Amanda. “The Intimacy and Comfort of Taylor Swift’s ‘Evermore.’” The New Yorker, 14 December 2020. https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/the-intimacy-and-comfort-of-taylor-swifts-evermore.

 

Reynolds, David S. “Emily Dickinson and Popular Culture.” The Cambridge Companion to Emily Dickinson, ed. by Wendy Martin, Cambridge University Press, 2002, pp. 167-190.

 

Richardson, Hollie. “Why Taylor Swift fans are convinced Emily Dickinson inspired her new album.” Stylist, January 2021. https://www.stylist.co.uk/entertainment/music/taylor-swift-evermore-fan-theory-emily-dickinson/462148.

 

Shaffer, Claire and Brittany Spanos. “‘Goodbye Earl’ to Emily Dickinson: A Rundown of Taylor Swift’s Influences on ‘Evermore.’” Rolling Stone, 11 December 2020. https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/goodbye-earl-to-emily-dickinson-a-rundown-of-taylor-swifts-influences-on-evermore-1102620/.

 

Stanton, Leanne Aciz. “Taylor Swift Is the ‘Happiest She’s Ever Been,’ Enjoying Private Romance With Joe Alwyn.” Us Weekly, 10 July 2018. https://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/taylor-swift-is-the-happiest-shes-ever-been-with-joe-alwyn/

 

Suskind, Alex. “Taylor Swift broke all her rules with Folklore—and gave herself a much-needed escape.” Entertainment Weekly. https://ew.com/music/taylor-swift-entertainers-of-the-year-2020/

 

Swift, Taylor. evermore. Republic Records, 2020. CD.

 

---. folklore. Republic Records, 2020. LP. 

 

---. Booklet. reputation. Big Machine Records, 2017. CD. 

 

@taylorswift13. “I’m elated to tell you that my 9th studio album...” 10 December 2020, Instagram, https://www.instagram.com/p/CInkR4Ajyi1

 

Walsh, Savannah. “The True Story Behind Taylor Swift’s ‘The Last Great American Dynasty.’” Elle, 24 July 2020. https://www.elle.com/culture/music/a33416288/taylor-swift-the-last-great-american-dynasty-true-story-meaning/

 

 

Ghosts in the Algorithm

 

@andsadprose. “your ivy grows.” 23 February 2021, https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeA34Yx4/.

 

@ariavelz. “I will only accept gay Emily Dickinson.” 13 October 2020, https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeSdX3Af/.

 

@bemyrobloxbabe. “might incite some anger but yellow > orange > red >>>>>>> green > pirple.” 12 February 2021, https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeAvFJKX/.

 

@joeroganclips. “‘It’s entirely possible’ - Joe Rogan.” 22 December 2019, https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeAvL8QR/.

 

Koetsier, John. “Massive TikTok Growth: Up 75% This Year, Now 33X More Users Than Nearest Direct Competitor.” Forbes, 14 September 2020. https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnkoetsier/2020/09/14/massive-tiktok-growth-up-75-this-year-now-33x-more-users-than-nearest-competitor/?sh=aae305c4fe46

 

@littlebasingse. “historians arguing about emily dickinson’s sexuality since she never married.” 12 February 2021, https://www.tiktok.com/@littlebasingse/video/6928590213002366214?sender_device=pc&sender_web_id=6894296181028128261&is_from_webapp=v1&is_copy_url=0

 

Smith, Martha Nell. “Suppressing the Books of Susan in Emily Dickinson.” Epistolary Stories: Letters, Fiction, Culture. ed. by Amanda Gilroy. University Press of Virginia, 2000. 

 

Dickinson, Emily. Open Me Carefully: Emily Dickinson’s Intimate Letters to Susan Huntington Dickinson, ed. by Martha Nell Smith and Ellen Louise Hart, Wesleyan University Press, 1998. 

 

@villanevies. “Emily Dickinson is a MOOD.” 18 February 2020, https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeA7KQLR/.

 

Wallaroo Media. “TikTok Statistics - Updated February 2021.” Wallaroo Blog, 6 Februrary 2021.

 

Wylde, Kaitlyn. “13 Different Sides of TikTok Beyond Dancing.” Bustle, 3 September 2020. https://www.bustle.com/life/sides-of-tiktok



 

"Dickinson-core"


@aherman2006. “Thoroughly enjoyed this DICKINSON-core by @RVoronaCote:” Twitter, 7 April 2021, 6:27 p.m., https://twitter.com/aherman2006/status/1379923696593162242

 

Ayers, Elaine. “QH INSTRUCTIONS.” https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YrrIHRJ3YfGOKtOjnf8N12MLDhLGlt8vMgpHHXyOFWM/edit. Accessed 16 March 2021.  

 

Brazilian, Alexa. “Separated by Distance? Send Pressed Flowers.” The New York Times Style Magazine, 24 November 2021. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/24/t-magazine/pressing-flowers-how-to-crafting.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=collection. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Cote, Rachel Voronoa. “Tell It Slant: The Rise of the Feminist Anachronistic Costume Drama.” VQR, Spring 2021. https://www.vqronline.org/essays-articles/2021/03/tell-it-slant

 

Dickinson, Emily. Herbarium, circa. 1839-1846. Harvard University, Houghton Library. https://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL.HOUGH:883158. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Farr, Judith. The Garden of Emily Dickinson. Harvard University Press, 2005. 

 

---. “Emily Dickinson’s Garden: The Poetry of Flowers.” Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, vol. 22, no. 1, May 2010. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Foussianes, Chloe. “On Dickinson, Cottagecore, and Dressing to Hide Away in the Woods.” Town & Country, 16 January 2021. https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/arts-and-culture/g35091966/dickinson-cottagecore-fashion/. Accessed 16 March 2021.   

 

Glotfelty, Cheryll, Karla Armbruster, Tom Lynch, eds. The Bioregional Imagination: Literature, Ecology, Place. University of Georgia Press, 2012. 

 

Kimmerer, Robin Wall. Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants. Milkweed Editions, 2015. 

 

Kuhn, Mary. “Dickinson and the Politics of Plant Sensibility.” ELH, vol. 85, no. 1, Spring 2018, pp. 141-170. 

 

Odell, Jenny. How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy. Melville House, 2020. 

 

Parks, Cecily. “The Swamps of Emily Dickinson.” The Emily Dickinson Journal, vol. 22, no. 1, 2013. Pp. 1-29. 

 

Popova, Maria. Figuring. Vintage, 2019. 

 

Skwarecki, Beth. “Press Flowers for a ‘Quarantine Herbarium’.” Lifehacker, 11 May, 2020. https://lifehacker.com/press-flowers-for-a-quarantine-herbarium-1843399113. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Slone, Isabel. “Escape into Cottagecore, Calming Ethos for Our Febrile Moment.” The New York Times, 10 March 2020. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/10/style/cottagecore.html. Accessed 16 March 2021. 

 

Smith, Martha Nell. “Suppressing the Books of Susan in Emily Dickinson.” Epistolary Histories: Letters, Fiction, Culture. Ed. Amanda Gilroy and W.M. Verhoeven. Charlottesville and London, University of Virginia Press, 2000.  

 

Smith, Martha Nell, ed. “Obituary for Emily Dickinson, Version 4.” Dickinson Electronic Archives. University of Virginia, 2019. http://www.emilydickinson.org/writings-by-susan-dickinson/reviews-essays-and-other-criticism/obituary-for-emily-dickinson

 

Smith, Martha Nell and Ellen Louise Hart, eds. Open Me Carefully: Emily Dickinson’s Intimate Letters to Susan Huntington Dickinson. Wesleyan University Press, 1998. 

 

Syme, Rachel. “The Allure of the Nap Dress, The Look of Gussied-Up Oblivion.” The New Yorker, 21 July 2020. https://www.newyorker.com/culture/on-and-off-the-avenue/the-allure-of-the-nap-dress-the-look-of-gussied-up-oblivion. Accessed 16 March 2021.  

 

TallBear, Kim. “An Indigenous Reflection on Working Beyond The Human/Not Human,” GLQ, vol. 21, no. 2-3, 2015. pp. 230-235. 

 

“The Queen’s Hamlet.” Chateau de Versailles, https://en.chateauversailles.fr/discover/estate/estate-trianon/queen-hamlet#history-of-the-premises. Accessed 16 March 2021.